Tobacco awareness


By Sherry Hayman - Meigs Health Matters



Hayman

Hayman


Cigarette smoking is a major cause of heart disease and stroke accounting for one out of every four deaths from these conditions. People who do not smoke, but are exposed to secondhand smoke at home or work have a 25-30% increased risk of heart disease and a 20-30% increased risk of stroke. These figures are astonishing; meanwhile, the American Lung Association is afraid that e-cigarettes and vaping will expose a new generation to tobacco-related ailments. According to the Surgeon General’s Report, E-cigarette use among kids is a significant public health concern. Parents, educators, and especially legislators must take action to prevent e-cigarette usage.

E-cigarettes are used by 20% (5 million) of all kids: a 135% growth in just two years. The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine published a report in January 2018 that analyzed over 800 separate studies. That research said unequivocally: using e-cigarettes poses health concerns. It came to the conclusion that e-cigarettes contain and release a variety of potentially harmful chemicals. According to the Academies’ assessment, there is moderate evidence indicating kids who use e-cigarettes are at increased risk of coughing and wheezing, as well as an increase in asthma exacerbations.

The e-liquid contained in cartridges or tanks is the main component of e-cigarettes. To make an e-liquid, nicotine is removed from tobacco and combined with a base, typically propylene glycol, as well as flavorings and colorings. Other compounds such as formaldehyde and acrolein are often added which can cause irreversible lung damage. Acrolein is an herbicide commonly used to kill weeds. It can cause acute lung injury and COPD. It also may cause asthma and lung cancer. Secondhand emissions contain nicotine, ultrafine particles, and flavorings such as diacetyl, a chemical linked to serious lung disease. Other volatile organic

compounds such as benzene, which is found in car exhaust; and heavy metals, such as nickel, tin, and lead are present in secondhand vapors.

The Food and Drug Administration has not found any e-cigarette to be safe and effective in helping smokers quit. If smokers are ready to quit smoking for good, they should call 1-800-QUIT NOW; talk with their doctor about finding the best way to quit using proven methods and FDA-approved treatments and counseling or call me at the Meigs County Health Department- 740-992-6626 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Hayman
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2022/04/web1_Sherry-Hayman-Public-Health-Nurse.jpgHayman

By Sherry Hayman

Meigs Health Matters

Sherry Hayman, RN, TTS, is a public health nurse at the Meigs County Health Department.

Sherry Hayman, RN, TTS, is a public health nurse at the Meigs County Health Department.