Residents discuss Rutland sanitary sewer project


Staff Report



RUTLAND — Residents of the Village of Rutland and customers of the Meigs County Sewer and Water District had an opportunity to hear informative details on the upcoming $3-million Rutland sanitary sewer upgrade project, which is set to begin in October of this year.

Meigs County Commissioners Jimmy Will, Tim Ihle and Shannon Miller met with village residents and village officials at Rutland Civic Center/Village Hall last month to explain the project, which will involve complete replacement of all existing grinder pumps with septic tanks connected to the village’s centralized wastewater collection and treatment system.

Mayor Tyler Eblin welcomed guests in attendance and introduced the county commissioners. Information regarding the project was presented by Commissioner Ihle.

Commissioner Ihle explained that each residence will receive a new, 1,000-gallon septic tank, replacing the obsolete grinder pumps, wherein solid matter will settle and gray water will be pumped out through the centralized collection lines and to the wastewater treatment plant. As part of ongoing maintenance, the Meigs County Sewer and Water District will pump out solid matter as routinely needed.

The new system will replace what commissioners dub as a “maintenance nightmare,” describing the current grinder pump systems. Commissioner Ihle indicated that the new septic tank pumps will require less electricity and less maintenance, thereby reducing energy and operating costs.

Commissioner Ihle indicated that the contractor, Bear Contracting from Bridgeport, W.Va., will conduct removal of the existing grinder pump system on the property of each residence and replace the existing system with the new septic tank system, replacing only the line(s), as needed, from the new septic tank system to the curb stop. Ihle confirmed that streets would not be excavated, and that existing central lines, those running beneath the streets, would remain in place, onto which the new residential septic tank systems would be connected.

The Rutland sanitary sewer project is expected to start in October, and is estimated be completed in July 2022, weather permitting and provided no contingencies arise.

Following a briefing of the new system, commissioners received questions from visitors. Those questions with definitive answers are paraphrased as follows:

Q: Will flooding be an issue for the new septic tank systems?

A: No, the new septic tank systems will be sealed tight, underground, and shouldn’t be affected by flooding.

Q: Is attaching the alarm boxes to the houses necessary?

A: No, system alarm boxes may be attached to the house or secured to a freestanding post, depending on the property owner’s preference.

Q: Will RID-X be used as treatment for solid matter in the new septic tank systems?

A: Maybe, RID-X or a similar treatment compound may be incorporated into the routine maintenance plan.

Q: Will an inspector oversee the implementation of the project?

A: Yes, a qualified inspector selected by the Meigs County Commissioners will be responsible for inspection of the new septic tank systems as they are installed in each property. The project will be overseen daily by the Meigs County Commissioners.

Q: What will be the new impression in the yard with the new septic tank system?

A: Each individual septic tank system will have a secured covering through which the system can be accessed.

Q: Will a power outage have an affect on the pump?

A: Yes, if power failure occurs, pumps in the new septic tank systems will not operate; however, the septic tank systems can be connected onto generators, if opted.

Q: Will additional pumping stations be required?

A: No, additional pumping stations will not be required.

Q: What if a property has insufficient space to install a new septic tank?

A: Engineers overseeing the implementation of the project will review this issue on a case by case basis and determine a solution that is best for both the system and the resident.

Q: Will my water and sewer bill increase?

A: Yes, water and sewer bills will increase gradually as part of the 10-year asset management plan mandated by the State of Ohio, with small, incremental increases each plan year. The Meigs County Sewer and Water District is currently in year seven of this 10-year asset management plan.

Q: Will the new septic tank system reduce or stop the smell of sewerage in the Village?

A: Yes, the new septic tank system will rid the village of sewer odors.

Q: Will the septic tank system pumps be loud?

A: Noise from the new septic tank system pumps will not be as loud of those from the existing grinder pumps.

Q: How often will septic tank system pumps run?

A: The new septic tank system pumps should run minimally, depending on the amount of gray water in the tank requiring a pump out to the wastewater treatment plant.

Q: What is the warranty period for the new septic tank systems?

A: The warranty period for the new septic tank systems is 10 years, which should be standard and easy to replace and locate parts if needed.

The Meigs County Sewer and Water District was formed after the Village of Rutland Water and Sewer Department was discontinued in 2012. The District, overseen by the Meigs County Commissioners, has since absorbed all assets, debts and operations of the once functional Village Water and Sewer Department and provides water distribution and wastewater collection and treatment utilities to the Village of Rutland as well as some unincorporated areas of Rutland Township.

Questions and concerns regarding the Rutland sanitary sewer project should be directed to the Meigs County Commissioners by calling 740-992-2895.

Information provided by Rutland Mayor Tyler Eblin.

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Staff Report