A cook-striker’s lament


The late Wayne Kincaid, Sr., pictured far left, while serving in the United States Navy working as a cook on large naval ships during World War II. Kincaid was a native of Point Pleasant.

The late Wayne Kincaid, Sr., pictured far left, while serving in the United States Navy working as a cook on large naval ships during World War II. Kincaid was a native of Point Pleasant.


Courtesy

When the clock rolls around to four,

You jump out of bed and run to the door.

You get to the galley still sleepy and tired,

You think of the rating you so much desired.

You work and slave and you cook and sweat,

And that stripe on your sleeve you never get.

But you say to yourself, “I can’t quit now,

Uncle Sam needs help so I’ll try somehow.”

So I’ll keep on plugging though I can’t understand,

How some of the boys, the ratings they land.

I’ve been in the service little over a year,

And I’m proud to work for a country so dear.

So I guess it’s no use for me to complain,

For a seaman I guess I must always remain.

Wayne Kincaid, Sr.

Petty Officer, 3rd Class

United States Navy

1943

The late Wayne Kincaid, Sr., pictured far left, while serving in the United States Navy working as a cook on large naval ships during World War II. Kincaid was a native of Point Pleasant.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/11/web1_Wayne-1.jpgThe late Wayne Kincaid, Sr., pictured far left, while serving in the United States Navy working as a cook on large naval ships during World War II. Kincaid was a native of Point Pleasant. Courtesy