Commemorating the Kibble family


By Kayla Hawthorne - Special to the Sentinel



The Olive Twp. Bicentennial Marker was unveiled on Wednesday evening to commemorate the Kibble family. Pictured are (left to right) Bicentennial Ambassador Grant Adams, Kibble descendants Pat Smith-Drake and Diana McLevey, and Bicentennial Ambassadors Brielle Newland and Cooper Schagel.

The Olive Twp. Bicentennial Marker was unveiled on Wednesday evening to commemorate the Kibble family. Pictured are (left to right) Bicentennial Ambassador Grant Adams, Kibble descendants Pat Smith-Drake and Diana McLevey, and Bicentennial Ambassadors Brielle Newland and Cooper Schagel.


Kayla Hawthorne | Photo

REEDSVILLE — The seventh bicentennial marker was unveiled at the Olive Twp. Fire Station in Reedsville to commemorate the Kibble Family on Wednesday evening.

The marker honors Edna B. (Kibble) Stewart (1891-1968), her husband Alfred C. Stewart (1874-1927), and her brother Anderson B. Kibble (1896-1974) for their dedication to the community and local students.

Born to George and Ida Kibble, Edna, a nurse, and Anderson, an executive at Goodyear, were two of nine children. They cared for their Reedsville community in many ways.

“[Edna] had talked to her brother about forming a foundation to help people with college,” said Bicentennial Ambassador Grant Adams. “Her idea was that if you had an education, you could always support yourself and that education was a way up.”

When Anderson passed away in 1974, his will set up the Kibble Foundation. Today, the foundation is ran by the great-nieces and nephew of Anderson and Edna — Pat Smith-Drake, David Smith and Diana McLevey.

“[The Kibble Foundation] gives scholarships to students of Meigs, Eastern, and Southern, who attend Ohio University, The Ohio State University, University of Rio Grande, Marietta College, Hocking College, and Washington State Community College,” said Bicentennial Ambassador Brielle Newland. “They have awarded over two million dollars to Eastern High School, churches, fire departments, Meigs County college bound students and more.”

The bicentennial marker also commemorates Edna’s husband Alfred Stewart. Alfred, who never lived in Meigs County, was an inventor and had over 80 patents, including for the speedometer, carburetor, and super spark plug. Several of his projects were with automobiles and mechanics.

“He rode with Henry Ford through Yellowstone National Park in one of Ford’s first cars,” Adams said. “They were going at a very slow speed by today’s standards, but to them it felt like they were flying.”

Edna met Alfred when he visited his ill father and she was a nurse. After Alfred passed away in 1927, Edna moved back to Reedsville to care for her mother and their home.

“It is a great honor and I’m sure somewhere from above they’re smiling down,” said Pat Smith-Drake, a niece of Edna and Anderson Kibble.

“Meigs County appreciates the generosity and contribution of the Kibble family and we are obnoxiously proud that they are in our community,” Newland said.

The Olive Twp. Bicentennial Marker was unveiled on Wednesday evening to commemorate the Kibble family. Pictured are (left to right) Bicentennial Ambassador Grant Adams, Kibble descendants Pat Smith-Drake and Diana McLevey, and Bicentennial Ambassadors Brielle Newland and Cooper Schagel.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/07/web1_7.19-Bicentennial-1.jpgThe Olive Twp. Bicentennial Marker was unveiled on Wednesday evening to commemorate the Kibble family. Pictured are (left to right) Bicentennial Ambassador Grant Adams, Kibble descendants Pat Smith-Drake and Diana McLevey, and Bicentennial Ambassadors Brielle Newland and Cooper Schagel. Kayla Hawthorne | Photo

By Kayla Hawthorne

Special to the Sentinel

Kayla Hawthorne is a freelance writer for The Daily Sentinel.

Kayla Hawthorne is a freelance writer for The Daily Sentinel.