Camp provides a lesson in nature


Working the watershed

By Kayla Hawthorne - Special to OVP



Campers spend time in Little Leading Creek looking for bugs and other creatures with Cynthia Bauers from Hocking College.

Campers spend time in Little Leading Creek looking for bugs and other creatures with Cynthia Bauers from Hocking College.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Campers inspect some of their finds from Little Leading Creek with Cynthia Bauers from Hocking College.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Campers spend time in Little Leading Creek exploring the habitat.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Hannah Swope from Meigs SWCD teaches the children how to use binoculars to look at birds.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Campers learn to test the water temperature and pH level of the water.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Campers learn about a healthy watershed.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Cynthia Bauers shows the campers the habitats that bugs and organisms might live in.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

RUTLAND — The Meigs County Soil and Water Conservation District hosted a two-day Watershed Day Camp for children in the county on Wednesday and Thursday.

Children aged 7 to 14 had the opportunity to learn about the environment during a free day-camp at the conservation district’s property on New Lima Road outside of Rutland.

Hannah Swope, the education coordinator for the SWCD, organized lessons for the children to learn about pollinators; wetlands and streams, along with the species that live in them; soil and species that live in it to improve quality; trees and native plants; coal mining and its effects on the land; tracking animals with radio collars; birds; and healthy eating.

“They’re making friends and doing things they don’t always get to do in school,” Swope said. “It’s a lot of hands-on things. We’re trying to get kids outside to learn about the environment that’s around them.”

Children got the change to be outdoors and gain and understanding of the natural environment that has always been around them. Swope hoped they received the answers to the questions they may have been wondering about.

The Meigs SWCD owns around 164 acres where they preserve nature and use for education. The property contains hiking trails, wildflowers, various tree and plant species, a high wall from coal mining; a five-acre wetland with muskrats and amphibians; warm season prairies for wildlife, a rain garden to utilize run off from the shelter house, and access to Little Leading Creek to conduct sampling of the microorganisms.

Campers spend time in Little Leading Creek looking for bugs and other creatures with Cynthia Bauers from Hocking College.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/06/web1_6.9-Watershed-1.jpgCampers spend time in Little Leading Creek looking for bugs and other creatures with Cynthia Bauers from Hocking College. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Campers inspect some of their finds from Little Leading Creek with Cynthia Bauers from Hocking College.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/06/web1_6.9-Watershed-2.jpgCampers inspect some of their finds from Little Leading Creek with Cynthia Bauers from Hocking College. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Campers spend time in Little Leading Creek exploring the habitat.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/06/web1_6.9-Watershed-3.jpgCampers spend time in Little Leading Creek exploring the habitat. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Hannah Swope from Meigs SWCD teaches the children how to use binoculars to look at birds.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/06/web1_6.9-Watershed-4.jpgHannah Swope from Meigs SWCD teaches the children how to use binoculars to look at birds. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Campers learn to test the water temperature and pH level of the water.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/06/web1_6.9-Watershed-5.jpgCampers learn to test the water temperature and pH level of the water. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Campers learn about a healthy watershed.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/06/web1_6.9-Watershed-6.jpgCampers learn about a healthy watershed. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Cynthia Bauers shows the campers the habitats that bugs and organisms might live in.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/06/web1_6.9-Watershed-7.jpgCynthia Bauers shows the campers the habitats that bugs and organisms might live in. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy
Working the watershed

By Kayla Hawthorne

Special to OVP

Kayla Hawthorne is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing.

Kayla Hawthorne is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing.