Prosecutor selected as participant in National Computer Forensics Institute Program


Staff Report



Participants in the Digital Evidence for Prosecutors program are pictured in a class photo.

Participants in the Digital Evidence for Prosecutors program are pictured in a class photo.


Courtesy photo

POMEROY —Meigs County Prosecutor James K. Stanley recently took part in a program hosted by the National Computer Forensics Institute.

From April 15-19, Stanley attended the Digital Evidence for Prosecutors program hosted by the National Computer Forensics Institute, which is a partnership between the United States Secret Service, the United States Department of Homeland Security, and the Alabama District Attorney’s Association.

Admission into the program was highly selective, and Stanley was one of only 24 prosecutors from across the country chosen to participate in the training, which was held in Hoover, Alabama, located just outside Birmingham. Digital Evidence for Prosecutors is a tuition-free program, and travel costs, a food stipend, and hotel accommodations were provided at no cost to attendees.

The National Computer Forensic Institute website describes the facility as a federally funded training center dedicated to instructing state and local officials in digital evidence and cyber crime investigations while focusing on current cyber crime trends, investigative methods, and prosecutorial and judicial challenges. The National Computer Forensic Institute is recognized as the premiere hi-tech crime training facility in the United States. Courses are administered by the United States Secret Service’s Criminal Investigative Division and the Alabama Office of Prosecution Services.

“It was an incredible honor to be selected as one of the few participants in this program from across the country and to learn from the experts in the field,” Stanley said. “The knowledge and skills gained from this training will be invaluable in prosecuting cases involving digital evidence but particularly regarding various cybercrimes committed in Meigs County including theft, identity fraud, and sex crimes committed against children.” Stanley learned about topics such as computer and mobile device hardware, operating systems, networking, data extraction, digital forensics, examination of data, and interpreting digital forensics reports.

Information provided by Prosecutor James K. Stanley.

Participants in the Digital Evidence for Prosecutors program are pictured in a class photo.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2019/04/web1_4.26-Class-photo_ne2019425154430602.jpgParticipants in the Digital Evidence for Prosecutors program are pictured in a class photo. Courtesy photo

Staff Report