Commissioners recognize County Government Month


Grant opportunities discussed

By Sarah Hawley - shawley@aimmediamidwest.com



This photo taken by drone camera shows several Meigs County employees.

This photo taken by drone camera shows several Meigs County employees.


Gary Coleman photo

POMEROY — A month set aside to recognize those who serve their counties and communities was recognized during Thursday’s Meigs County Commissioner meeting.

April is National County Government Month. The national theme for 2018 is “Serving the Underserved.”

A proclamation approved by the commissioners noted that the nation’s 3,069 counties serve more than 300 million people, providing essential services, including providing health care, administering justice, keeping communities safe and creating economic opportunities.

“Meigs County and all counties take pride in their responsibility to protect and enhance the health, welfare and safety of its residents in efficient and cost-effective ways,” read a portion of the proclamation. “Meigs County elected officials and employees work very hard for the people they serve, often doing so in an under-resourced, understaffed and underfunded environment.”

In other business, Clerk/Grants Administrator Betsy Entsminger gave the commissioners an update on the potential grant project to extend the walking path to connect the current paths in Middleport and Pomeroy.

Entsminger explained that the project, when funding becomes available, will be completed in phases (or segments) which will take the path from Dairy Queen in Middleport to the car wash on West Main Street in Pomeroy. Another phase will go from the car wash to the current Pomeroy path. There is also the possibility, looking long term, of connecting the Middleport path out to Route 7 allowing for a loop to be created through the area.

Karen Pawloski from Buckeye Hills and consultant Jane Miller spoke to the commissioners about the potential to apply for funding as a region for broadband access.

Miller explained that she has been serving as the project manager for the Tiger Grant which ODOT received to expand broadband in 10 counties. From that came the idea of working as a region to apply for other funding to expand broadband opportunities in counties not served by the ODOT grant.

Miller approached Buckeye Hills with the idea of having the agency serve as the government entity to handle the project which would be applied for through Appalachian Regional Commission funding.

Currently, Miller is meeting with representatives in Noble, Perry, Athens, Hocking and Meigs counties to explain the idea and ask for their support for the potential application.

A resolution is expected to be brought to the commissioners at a later date for consideration.

Pawloski also told the commissioners of a potential Americans for Community Living grant for transportation for elderly and disabled individuals. She said she was looking to apply for the $35,000 grant for Meigs and Noble counties.

Next week’s meeting of the Meigs County Commissioners has been rescheduled for Friday, April 27 at 11 a.m. as the commissioners will be traveling to Washington D.C. on April 25 and 26 to meet with officials.

This photo taken by drone camera shows several Meigs County employees.
https://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2018/04/web1_4.22-Local-GovtMonth2018419193126594.jpgThis photo taken by drone camera shows several Meigs County employees. Gary Coleman photo
Grant opportunities discussed

By Sarah Hawley

shawley@aimmediamidwest.com

Sarah Hawley is the managing editor of The Daily Sentinel.

Sarah Hawley is the managing editor of The Daily Sentinel.