MHS preparing students for future careers


Program trains students for automotive industry

By Erin Perkins - eperkins@aimmediamidwest.com



An auto student working on a class assignment.


Auto students together on a vehicle repair.


Auto students working together to complete a class assignment.


POMEROY — Meigs High School offers a variety of programs for students desiring a career technical education.

The Junior and Senior Automotive Technology programs may be taken once a student has met their freshman and sophomore years criteria for their school district. Jeff Bissell, automotive technology instructor, said these programs are open to Meigs, Eastern, and Southern Local High School upperclassmen where they are taught the following skills: identification, diagnosis, and repair of engines; manual and automatic transmissions, drive lines, and axles diagnosis and repair; automotive electricity; braking systems regarding anti-lock and traction control; different hydraulic systems diagnosis and repair; base knowledge of air conditioning and heating systems repair.

“The main goal is college and/or career readiness,” said Bissell.

Bissell has worked at MHS for nine years teaching his students not only automotive skills, but also skills for entrepreneurship, honest business practices, estimations, creating invoices, customer service relations, and building computer and online repair libraries. He shared that when students complete the program, they will have Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), state, student, and professional certifications.

Bissell expressed that upon graduation his students will be suitable for employment in automotive repair work environments including auto part assembly plants, auto dealerships, independent repair facilities, or with an extended effort self-employment. He said some of his students will find employment in the construction or gas and oil field as repair technicians.

Bissell said he has his students build an engine based power plant simulator their junior year covering all of their base knowledge. The students will also accomplish the following tasks: break down several assemblies such as engines, transmissions, differentials, and electrical components to diagnose and determine the type of repair needed; build brake and fuel lines; solder and build circuitry according to Ohm’s Law. He shared that when his students are seniors they continue to build upon their current automotive knowledge and focus on scan tools and brakes, suspensions, alignments, emissions, steering features, and electrical skills in order to repair vehicles for themselves and/or others.

An auto student working on a class assignment.
http://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2018/01/web1_0124.Auto_.jpgAn auto student working on a class assignment.

Auto students together on a vehicle repair.
http://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2018/01/web1_mhs-auto-pics-005.jpgAuto students together on a vehicle repair.

Auto students working together to complete a class assignment.
http://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2018/01/web1_mhs-auto-pics-017.jpgAuto students working together to complete a class assignment.
Program trains students for automotive industry

By Erin Perkins

eperkins@aimmediamidwest.com

Erin Perkins is a staff writer for Ohio Valley Publishing.

Erin Perkins is a staff writer for Ohio Valley Publishing.

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