The works of God


They are designed to draw our attention to God

By Rev. Ron Branch



Branch


I went to elementary school for two years with a kid by the name of T. W. Taruthers during the fifth and sixth grades. He was a tall kid for his age, lanky and lean. As I recall, his family seemed the poorest perhaps of the other families associated with our particular class. I can still image the run-down house they lived in just about a quarter of a mile off of Bringle Ferry Road.

For a long time, kids in the class would not have anything to do T. W. But, our attention was suddenly drawn to him when we realized what he could do.

I sat behind T. W. in the first line of chairs on the left side of the class room in Miss Hartman’s fifth grade group. One day I noticed that he was hunched over something on his desk that he was working on. When the lead in his pencil got too worn down, he got up to go to the pencil sharpener. It was then that I espied what he had been doing. He had been in the process of drawing a fantastic likeness of a horse.

I approached the teacher’s desk, and said lowly, “Miss Hartman, you ought to see how good T. W. can draw.” As it turned out, the kid had a sure talent for drawing. T. W.’s works of art were very impressive. From that point, we became drawn to T. W. because of his art works. People are fascinated with artists.

T. W. came to remembrance recently as I studied Psalms 111, for the psalmist was particularly drawn to the fantastic works of God. “The works of the Lord are great,” he wrote. Furthermore, the works of God are “honorable, glorious, and righteous,” he wrote. I can imagine that the psalmist felt a deeper spiritual commitment as a result of his considerations and contemplations of the things that God had done and was doing.

But, when he said that God “has shown the people the power of His works,” it is a statement that captivates our attention. In saying so, the psalmist essentially points out that God’s motivation behind his fantastic works is designed to draw our attention to God. This thought is critically instructive because God wants us to be ever mindful of Him.

The subtle lure of life is to be so involved with the living of it that mindfulness of God is drastically minimized. We are strongly urged both in round-about and direct ways to not be mindful of God. After all, mindfulness of God affects opinions, and, thus, politics. Mindfulness of God affects altruism, and, thus, the amassing of personal resources. Mindfulness of God affects the empowerment of liberty in us, and, thus, the hold of other entities to depend on them.

But, the works of God “stand fast forever and ever,” according to the psalmist, to draw us to a needful mindfulness of God. For those of us who are drawn to the works of God, it has changed our lives. Take for example the work of God in Creation. Think about the magnitude of it as well as the intricacies of it. But, what is the purpose of the work of God in Creation? According to Apostle Paul, it is for the purpose of showing us the Godhead, and when we acknowledge Him as Creator, it gives us hope and assurance that cannot be gained from any other source.

Take for example also the work of God as it involves redemption, point-specifically, the Cross of Jesus Christ. Many are drawn to God, because, in that mighty work, God did for us what we could not do for ourselves. Affection for God remains the focus of those who receive the redemption of God through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, and affection for God flies in the face of the egos of men, this present world system, and the devil. No wonder there is so much animosity for Christianity.

I do not know what ever came of T. W. Toward the end of our sixth grad year, his family and he moved suddenly. But, the boy sure could draw.

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http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/02/web1_Branch-Ron-1.jpgBranch
They are designed to draw our attention to God

By Rev. Ron Branch

The Rev. Ron Branch is pastor of Faith Baptist Church in Mason, W.Va.

The Rev. Ron Branch is pastor of Faith Baptist Church in Mason, W.Va.