Eclipse sweeps over area


OHIO VALLEY — It was a sight unseen in the area for many, many years, and one that many had never had the opportunity to experience.

Local residents of all ages gathered in their lawns, parking lots, in front of businesses and even on the courthouse balconies with their eclipse glasses, view boxes and even welder’s masks, to view the rare sight.

While Meigs County was not in the path of totality, viewers in the area could see approximately an 88 percent cover of the sun as part of the partial solar eclipse.

At the Pomeroy Branch of the Meigs County District Public Library, A.J. Roush, a volunteer with The Planetary Society, presented a program on the eclipse and the society itself.

The presentation included an explanation of what causes the eclipse to be visible to those on Earth. When the sun, moon and Earth are in perfect alignment, a total solar eclipse can occur, depending on the distance the moon is away from the Earth and if is at the proper distance to cover the entire sun from view.

Following the presentation, glasses and viewers were handed out to those in attendance to go outside and safely take a look at the eclipse.

When the next total solar eclipse occurs in 2024, this area will be closer to the path of totality than it was in this case, making it even closer to a total eclipse for those in Southeast Ohio.

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Dozens of people with eclipse glasses, pin hole view finders and other viewing devices gathered on the lawn next to the Pomeroy Library as well as the parking lot area to view the partial solar eclipse on Monday afternoon. Prior to the viewing of the eclipse, A.J. Roush, a volunteer with the Planetary Society gave a presentation about the society and the solar eclipse. Also pictured (bottom left) with Roush is Chelsea Poole of the Meigs County Public Library.
http://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/08/web1_8.22-Eclipse-1.jpgDozens of people with eclipse glasses, pin hole view finders and other viewing devices gathered on the lawn next to the Pomeroy Library as well as the parking lot area to view the partial solar eclipse on Monday afternoon. Prior to the viewing of the eclipse, A.J. Roush, a volunteer with the Planetary Society gave a presentation about the society and the solar eclipse. Also pictured (bottom left) with Roush is Chelsea Poole of the Meigs County Public Library.

These photos of the partial eclipses were taken by placing a camera up to eclipse glasses.
http://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/08/web1_8.22-Eclipse-3.jpgThese photos of the partial eclipses were taken by placing a camera up to eclipse glasses.

These photos of the partial eclipses were taken by placing a camera up to eclipse glasses.
http://www.mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/08/web1_8.22-Eclpise-2.jpgThese photos of the partial eclipses were taken by placing a camera up to eclipse glasses.

By Sarah Hawley

shawley@aimmediamidwest.com

Sarah Hawley is the managing editor of The Daily Sentinel.