The Siege of Fort Randolph


Past meets the present in outdoor drama

By Morgan McKinniss - mmckinniss@civitasmedia.com



Many of the reenactors played the part of American soldier, wearing uniforms and armed with flintlock muskets.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Just before the Siege took place, Native American reenactors stand in preparation while a frontiersman patrols the wall.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

The Siege was caused because of the death of Chief Cornstalk, which took place inside the Fort. Here is Cornstalk meeting with frontiersman just before his death.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

This is the shot that sparked the conflict. An Englishman takes aim while the crowd looks on in awe.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

After the death of Cornstalk, settlers go out into the fields for harvest. Little do they know that Native Americans are hidden in wait to launch an attack on the fort.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Two Native Americans attack a settler in the field, brutally killing him while the women and children flee for safety inside Fort Randolph. This was the beginning of the Siege.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

In response to the murder of an Englishman, trained soldiers fired many volleys into the woods at Native American assailants. This was an intense display, with many muskets firing simultaneously.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

From inside the parapets of Fort Randolph, more reenactors help defend the settlement. Frontiersman staged along the wall and anywhere they could fire a musket from at the attacking Native Americans.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Many of the natives lay in wait, choosing when to attack and take shots in return.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

After several minutes of fighting, the air was filled with clouds of gun smoke. The Native Americans took advantage of this cover.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Despite the poor visibility, defenders of the fort still take aim. Each musket must have more powder poured and packed from the muzzle of the gun between each shot. Skilled soldiers could fire up to three times a minute at this point in history.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Inside the fort, spectators see the action from a different perspective. Young children ran about to the soldiers giving more gunpowder and munitions. The large earthen structure in the middle is a magazine, a safe place for ammo and gunpowder.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

A kart was abandoned by the settlers in the field, which became cover for the attackers as the pressed the fort. The Native American reenactors are wearing authentic and accurate costumes.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

The frontiersman did well the stay behind the wall, taking shots as needed. Here we see two soldiers defending Fort Randolph.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

To end the siege, the Natives waived a white flag in surrender.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

As a poignant reminder of the day, a reenactor chats with a local photographer - a unique combination of the past and the present. A visual representation of what goes on at Fort Randolph, a remembrance and portrayal of the past in a modern context.


Morgan McKinniss/OVP

POINT PLEASANT, W.Va. — Last Saturday, the community gathered at Krodel Park to witness the Siege of Fort Randolph.

The event is part of a weekend portrayal of life in colonial times, with vendors, reenactors, and displays giving a glimpse into that era. Reeneactors wore real garments of the 1700’s, carried era-correct tools and muskets, and did the regular duties of a person living in the 18th Century. Blacksmithing was demonstrated, cooking over a fire, crafting, and many others.

The peak of excitement was the outdoor drama of the siege, which unfolded on Saturday afternoon with reenactors living the history of the death of Chief Cornstalk and the conflict that ensued between the early frontiersman and the Native Americans. The reenactors did use real guns, with real gunpowder, although they did not fire real projectiles and nobody was harmed throughout the reenactment.

These are some of the pictures portraying the real drama, real gunpowder, and real excitement of the Siege of Fort Randolph.

Many of the reenactors played the part of American soldier, wearing uniforms and armed with flintlock muskets.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0100201752615716697.jpgMany of the reenactors played the part of American soldier, wearing uniforms and armed with flintlock muskets. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Just before the Siege took place, Native American reenactors stand in preparation while a frontiersman patrols the wall.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0115201752615721708.jpgJust before the Siege took place, Native American reenactors stand in preparation while a frontiersman patrols the wall. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

The Siege was caused because of the death of Chief Cornstalk, which took place inside the Fort. Here is Cornstalk meeting with frontiersman just before his death.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_015120175261572759.jpgThe Siege was caused because of the death of Chief Cornstalk, which took place inside the Fort. Here is Cornstalk meeting with frontiersman just before his death. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

This is the shot that sparked the conflict. An Englishman takes aim while the crowd looks on in awe.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0195201752615732680.jpgThis is the shot that sparked the conflict. An Englishman takes aim while the crowd looks on in awe. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

After the death of Cornstalk, settlers go out into the fields for harvest. Little do they know that Native Americans are hidden in wait to launch an attack on the fort.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0257201752615739272.jpgAfter the death of Cornstalk, settlers go out into the fields for harvest. Little do they know that Native Americans are hidden in wait to launch an attack on the fort. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Two Native Americans attack a settler in the field, brutally killing him while the women and children flee for safety inside Fort Randolph. This was the beginning of the Siege.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_028720175261574519.jpgTwo Native Americans attack a settler in the field, brutally killing him while the women and children flee for safety inside Fort Randolph. This was the beginning of the Siege. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

In response to the murder of an Englishman, trained soldiers fired many volleys into the woods at Native American assailants. This was an intense display, with many muskets firing simultaneously.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0342201752615749873.jpgIn response to the murder of an Englishman, trained soldiers fired many volleys into the woods at Native American assailants. This was an intense display, with many muskets firing simultaneously. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

From inside the parapets of Fort Randolph, more reenactors help defend the settlement. Frontiersman staged along the wall and anywhere they could fire a musket from at the attacking Native Americans.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0354201752615755147.jpgFrom inside the parapets of Fort Randolph, more reenactors help defend the settlement. Frontiersman staged along the wall and anywhere they could fire a musket from at the attacking Native Americans. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Many of the natives lay in wait, choosing when to attack and take shots in return.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_036920175261580537.jpgMany of the natives lay in wait, choosing when to attack and take shots in return. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

After several minutes of fighting, the air was filled with clouds of gun smoke. The Native Americans took advantage of this cover.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_040220175261586117.jpgAfter several minutes of fighting, the air was filled with clouds of gun smoke. The Native Americans took advantage of this cover. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Despite the poor visibility, defenders of the fort still take aim. Each musket must have more powder poured and packed from the muzzle of the gun between each shot. Skilled soldiers could fire up to three times a minute at this point in history.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0417201752615810681.jpgDespite the poor visibility, defenders of the fort still take aim. Each musket must have more powder poured and packed from the muzzle of the gun between each shot. Skilled soldiers could fire up to three times a minute at this point in history. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

Inside the fort, spectators see the action from a different perspective. Young children ran about to the soldiers giving more gunpowder and munitions. The large earthen structure in the middle is a magazine, a safe place for ammo and gunpowder.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0489201752615815734.jpgInside the fort, spectators see the action from a different perspective. Young children ran about to the soldiers giving more gunpowder and munitions. The large earthen structure in the middle is a magazine, a safe place for ammo and gunpowder. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

A kart was abandoned by the settlers in the field, which became cover for the attackers as the pressed the fort. The Native American reenactors are wearing authentic and accurate costumes.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0502201752615820995.jpgA kart was abandoned by the settlers in the field, which became cover for the attackers as the pressed the fort. The Native American reenactors are wearing authentic and accurate costumes. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

The frontiersman did well the stay behind the wall, taking shots as needed. Here we see two soldiers defending Fort Randolph.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0524201752615826341.jpgThe frontiersman did well the stay behind the wall, taking shots as needed. Here we see two soldiers defending Fort Randolph. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

To end the siege, the Natives waived a white flag in surrender.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0526201752615831218.jpgTo end the siege, the Natives waived a white flag in surrender. Morgan McKinniss/OVP

As a poignant reminder of the day, a reenactor chats with a local photographer – a unique combination of the past and the present. A visual representation of what goes on at Fort Randolph, a remembrance and portrayal of the past in a modern context.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2017/05/web1_DSC_0087201752615836862.jpgAs a poignant reminder of the day, a reenactor chats with a local photographer – a unique combination of the past and the present. A visual representation of what goes on at Fort Randolph, a remembrance and portrayal of the past in a modern context. Morgan McKinniss/OVP
Past meets the present in outdoor drama

By Morgan McKinniss

mmckinniss@civitasmedia.com